Archive for January, 2018

It’s always good to have a one-stop-shop when you try to host a website or application online. But, that might not be the best bang for your buck. So, you will end up hosting the application with a vendor, having your domain managed by a different one, and maybe you’re using G-suite or O-365 as your email system; and this is my case to pick and choose the best options depending on business requirements and potential growth. So, I’ve decided to use https://domains.google to be my domain registrar for a client that I worked with. Though, it comes with challenges sometimes.

Google domains provide cheap, lightning-fast, and intuitive service as compared to other service providers. It cost me $12 a year per domain. You get all features offered by other registrars plus 2-factor authentication to protect your dashboard.

One of the challenges would be the need to create manually MX records based on your service provider, create A records for your domain as well as sub-domains. When you create a sub-domain from cPanel, you need to create a record to point to the newly created folder (sub-domain). To do so, follow the steps below:

  1. Login to https://domains.google
  2. Go to DNS
  3. Scroll down until you get Custom records
  4. In the first box type the name of the sub-domain (in my case, the sub-domain is “test.mysite.com” so you should type test)
  5. In the second box select the record type which is (A record)
  6. In the third box, you can leave the default value (1H)
  7. In the fourth box, type in the IP address of the server (this should be the same as the IP address in www and @)
  8. Now, save and test by going to the link from a browser (http://test.mysite.com). It should work like a charm!
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GREM test-taking guide

Posted: January 7, 2018 in Defense, Misc
Tags: , , ,

When I decided to take this course, I signed up for the one OnDemand. What I like about these OnDemand courses is that the course is available for 4 months. Not just that, but you will have access to a group of great mentors available at the tip of your fingers. Those mentors will try to answer your questions and help you understand any point you face that you can’t figure out. I strongly urge you to use their services to ask any question or discuss any related topic that crosses your mind as you are going through the course.

Now, remember, if you intend to take the course, you need to know that this course is a bit dense and requires technical “understanding” of programming languages, computer architecture, and software engineering in general. Though, you don’t need to be a developer to bloom in this field, but the more knowledge you have in these different areas, the easier it is to absorb the material and apply it to your future investigations. By taking this course you will be able to do the following:

  • Set up a Malware Analysis Lab
  • Learn how to use debuggers and disassemblers
  • Perform behavior analysis of a malware sample
  • Perform static analysis of a malware sample
  • Learn the fundamentals of Assembly language
  • Analyze Microsoft Office files with Macros (doc, xl, ppt), PDF files, Win32 samples, memory analysis with Volatility
  • Analyze unpacked and packed malware
  • Learn about common malware obfuscation and de-obfuscation methods

Note that the list above is not an exhaustive list. There are more topics, tips, and tricks in the course. Always remember the course itself is not your only resource to learn the material. In often instances, I’ve found myself on YouTube searching for multiple explanations for technical terms or further details on assembly instructions. It’s part of the course to pause the SANS video and do some searching to better understand the material. You should find yourself repeating video segments multiple times to ensure you understand that point, otherwise, you won’t be able to apply it in real life.

On the other hand, you need to complete 2 tasks as you go through the study material:

  1. Create your own summary of concepts, principles, how-to, and your understanding of any methodology learned throughout the course. This becomes handy as your play-book and as your future reference. Personally, I keep a notebook with hand written notes. Future plan is to digitize my notes so that it’s accessible and available with higher retention period.
  2. Create your index for the test. My strategy was having an Excel spreadsheet open. Any term, command, or concept that I feel is of importance, I highlight on the book with a highlighter and type that word in my excel file along with the book number and page number.

I can’t stress enough that I found myself still using my notes and index. It’s not for passing the test, it’s your reference when you need it.

The key to any technical course is practicing. Find a good reverse engineering CTF to hone your skills and remember, “Practice makes Perfect!”